The Eucalypts
***
Icons
of the
Australian
Bush
EucaLink         A Web Guide to the Eucalypts
Eucalyptus acmenoides

Eucalyptus acmenoides Schauer, in Walp., Repert. Bot. Syst. 2, suppl. 1 924 (1843).
TYPE: New South Wales, beyond Castle Hill, A. Cunningham 20, 14 Jan 1817 (holo K, iso K, MEL).
Eucalyptus pilularis var. acmenoides (Schauer) Benth., Fl. Austral. 3: 208 (1867).
Eucalyptus triantha Link, Enum. Hort. Berol. 2: 30 (1822).
TYPE: none cited. Occurrence given as "Hab. in Australia h. T." Link types were destroyed in Berlin (TL2).


Habit: Tree, Height to 30 m high (sometimes 50).
Bark: Bark persistent throughout, stringy (prickly), grey to red-brown. Branchlets green. Pith glands absent; Bark glands absent. Cotyledons reniform.
Leaves: Intermediate leaves disjunct early, broad lanceolate, straight, entire, glossy green, petiolate, 13 cm long, 5 mm wide. Adult leaves disjunct, lanceolate or broad lanceolate, falcate, acute, oblique or basally tapered, glossy, green, thin, discolorous, 8–12 cm long, 1.5–2.5 mm wide; Petioles narrowly flattened or channelled, Petioles 8–15 mm long. Lateral veins obscure, acute or obtuse, moderately spaced.
Inflorescences: Conflorescence simple, axillary; Umbellasters 7-flowered to 11-flowered to more than 11 flowered, regular. Peduncles narrowly flattened or angular (to 3mm wide), 6–15 mm long. Pedicels terete, 2–6 mm long.
Flowers: Buds ovoid to fusiform, not glaucous or pruinose, 5–7 mm long, 3–4 mm diam. Calyx calyptrate; persisting to anthesis. Calyptra conical or elongate acute, 2 times as long as hypanthium or 3 times as long as hypanthium, as wide as hypanthium; smooth. Hypanthium smooth. Flowers white, or cream.
Fruits: Fruits hemispherical, pedicellate, 4 locular, 4–8 mm long, 4–7 mm diam. Disc depressed or flat (narrow). Valves enclosed or rim-level. Chaff cuboid, chaff same colour as seed.

Occurrence: Locally frequent; wet sclerophyll forest or woodland on deeper soils of moderate fertility and regular moisture.
Distribution: Qld, or N.S.W. N.S.W. regions North Coast, or Central Coast.

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