PlantNET Home PlantNET Home | Search NSW Flora | Contact Us  
FloraOnline
Introduction
Plant Name Search
Index Search
Spatial Search
Identification Keys
Classification
Glossary
HerbLink (Type Images)
WeedAlert
Other PlantNET Sites
Other Data Sources
NEW SOUTH WALES FLORA ONLINE Printable Page

Acacia notabilis F.Muell.
Family Fabaceae
Subfamily Mimosoideae
Common name: mallee golden wattle, Flinders wattle

Acacia notabilis F.Muell. APNI*

Synonyms: Racosperma notabile (F.Muell.) Pedley APNI*

Description: Erect or spreading shrub 1–5 m high; bark smooth, reddish brown to grey; branchlets angled at extremities, glabrous.

Phyllodes ± narrow-elliptic to oblanceolate, ± straight, 5–15 cm long, 8–25 mm wide, leathery, glabrous, ± glaucous, midvein and marginal veins prominent, lateral veins ± faint, apex subacute or obtuse; 1 small gland at base and sometimes a second gland about a third along margin; pulvinus 3–5 mm long.

Inflorescences 4–16 in an axillary raceme; axis 2–7 cm long; peduncles 3–6 mm long, ± stout, glabrous; heads globose, usually 45–60-flowered, 7–8 mm diam., bright yellow.

Pods ± straight, raised on opposite sides over alternate seeds, 3–7 cm long, 8–14 mm wide, thinly leathery, glabrous; seeds transverse; funicle filiform.


Illustration
C. Wardrop

Habit
Photo T.M. Tame

Flower
Photo T.M. Tame

Flowering: July–November.

Distribution and occurrence: occurs in the Broken Hill district where it is rare.

Grows in mallee communities and open woodland, on stony and rocky hills.
NSW subdivisions: NFWP, SFWP
Other Australian states: Vic. S.A.
Threatened species: NSW TSCA: Endangered
AVH map***

Possibly naturalised in New South Wales from plantings around Broken Hill or, if natural, it appears to be now uncommon in New South Wales. Related to Acacia beckleri, which has longer and narrower phyllodes, larger flower heads and longitudional seeds in the pods. May also be confused with A. hakeoides and A. gladiiformis, which also have the seeds placed longitudionally in the legume. The name probably refers to the attractive appearance of the species in the field. The gum and seeds are reported to have been used by the Aborigines as a food.

Text by P.G. Kodela & T.M. Tame
Taxon concept: P.G. Kodela & G.J. Harden, Flora of NSW Vol. 2 (2002)


APNI* Provides a link to the Australian Plant Name Index (hosted by the Australian National Botanic Gardens) for comprehensive bibliographic data
***The AVH map option provides a detailed interactive Australia wide distribution map drawn from collections held by all major Australian herbaria participating in the Australian Virtual Herbarium project.
  Privacy | Copyright | Disclaimer | About PlantNET | Cite PlantNET