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Atriplex australasica Moq.
Family Chenopodiaceae
Atriplex australasica Moq. APNI*

Description: : Annual 40–100 cm high, spreading to erect, branches quadrangular, almost glabrous. Monoecious.

Lower leaves triangular to lanceolate, often hastate with forwardly pointed lobes, base cuneate, to 5 cm or in favourable conditions 10 cm long and 1.5–4 cm wide, margins entire to sinuate or deeply serrate, glabrous or mealy beneath particularly when young, upper leaves mostly entire, linear and much smaller than the lower. Petiole to 2 cm.

Inflorescence spike-like with axillary clusters of mixed male and female flowers, flower clusters at first continuous but later disjunct.

: Bracteoles triangular or deltoid 5–6 mm long and wide, entire, united in lower half or free to the base, entire or with one or two teeth, smooth or with warty protruberances consisting of large spongy cells apparent at least near the base when mature, becoming black and thickened with age. Sessile. Seeds: 2 types, brown and black, orbicular, radical basal. Horizontal.


Flowering: Aug – May

Distribution and occurrence: Coasts of SE Australia including Tasmania

in wet brackish or estuarine situations, margins of salt and brackish lakes inland.
NSW subdivisions: NC, CC, SC
Other Australian states: Qld Vic. S.A.
AVH map***

Usually considered endemic but may be introduced from Asia.

Text by B.M. Wiecek
Taxon concept: Flora of NSW 1 (1990), Fl. Aust. Vol 4 (1984), Flora of Victoria, Vol 3 (1996), Plants of Western NSW (1992), Flora South Australia Vol 1 (1986)

APNI* Provides a link to the Australian Plant Name Index (hosted by the Australian National Botanic Gardens) for comprehensive bibliographic data
***The AVH map option provides a detailed interactive Australia wide distribution map drawn from collections held by all major Australian herbaria participating in the Australian Virtual Herbarium project.
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